Saturday, September 30

Today’s strip was not available for preview, which, honestly, is probably a damn good thing.

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15 Comments

Filed under Son of Stuck Funky

15 responses to “Saturday, September 30

  1. billytheskink

    “Struggling to cope”? Understatement of the year.

    I can’t believe it’s been ten years since Lisa’s Story either. Feels like twenty six.

  2. louder

    I’m sure his living wife loves to hear that! “Struggling to cope” while married to a woman who can never measure to the love of my life — what a complete and total a**hole.

    • billytheskink

      I do not think it can be stressed enough that the book that is explicitly (both in universe and in real life) about the beginnings of Les’ relationship with Cayla is subtitled “Lisa’s Story Concludes”. The book that features a silhouette of Cayla on the cover (again, both in strip and in real life) is subtitled “Lisa’s Story Concludes”.

  3. Smirks 'R Us

    Hey Cayla, how’s that boot heel feel?

    And I love the unintended hilarity of BatHack’s portrayal of a book signing. One old lady hanging around making small talk with the “author” with nary another soul in sight for what seems like an eternity. Ya know Tom, some authors actually attract lines of people who shuffle through for 15 seconds of contact if they’re lucky.

  4. Epicus Doomus

    Yeah, Dick f*cking Facey “copes” by endlessly reliving every single second of Lisa’s life and meticulously detailing every single Lisa thought and memory he has. And Tom Batiuk “copes” with her untimely death by taking time to remind everyone about the story he wrote that time, the one that apparently granted him a pass to never have to write another one. Yes Tom, we all remember your many clever little Lisa stories and we remember when you killed the character off for easy pathos, cheap shock value and a bit of modest mainstream attention. We also remember being reminded about “Lisa’s Story” every few weeks for five-plus years and how it was available at fine book retailers everywhere…how could we ever forget?

    That said, this could have been a hell of a lot worse. Apparently BatNom doesn’t even have the enthusiasm to do a real “LS” arc anymore, instead settling for this stupid crossover drollery that never would have made the Lisa cut seven or eight years ago. He just slapped a few variations of that maudlin “LS” cover art together, made it the background, threw together some half-assed dialog and lazy wordplay and called it a day. No ghosts, no anxiety attacks, no raging self-doubt, no airplane meltdowns, no odes to the misery of publishing, nothing. When a ‘LS” arc bores him you know he really has nothing left in the tank.

  5. You know the Taj Mahal was built in about the same twenty years it’s taken Les to have a conversation with someone, anyone, that wasn’t about Dead Lisa Who Died Of Death.

  6. Jimmy

    How does Mrs. Batiuk feel about all this? It’s obvious he loves Lisa Moore than he does her.

  7. The problem is that Batiuk looks at this morbid piece of crap Les and, having depicted him as wallowing in how her death affected HIM as if it’s always and only been about how HE (and not how her estranged family or living children) feels about things and how he treats Cayla like his house Negro instead of his wife, sees him as coping with things like a person should.

  8. sgtsaunders

    And part of trying to cope involved publicly masturbating at a New Year’s Eve party. Argh, I can’t get that ish out of my memory, Captain.

  9. Don

    “Ten years ago”? Does this mean there’s a signing for the first book on Crankshaft?

  10. “Ten years ago” is proof positive that there was never a “time jump.” There was an “age jump” but no moving forward in time.

  11. bad wolf

    10 years? Hmm. Well, it’s definitely coming up on 5th Anniversary to Second Place, i wonder if she’s unpacked her bags for the trip to Hong Kong?

    j/k, it’s time for another Lisa’s Legacy Run in mid-October.

  12. Charles

    This is another episode of Batiuk sharing more about his characters than he intends. What’s striking about this strip is how Les just casually talks about his grief to a stranger. Remember, these two had no significant contact between them in the ~25 years since Les appeared at Lillian’s bookstore to hock Fallen Star, so he doesn’t share any intimacy with her whatsoever. His relationship with Lisa means nothing to Lillian beyond whatever she got from reading his book.

    And yet when she mentions the benign fact of how long it’s been since he wrote Lisa’s Story, he, unprompted, smarmily refers to the alleged great personal grief he felt at the loss of his wife. He just shared what should be a deeply personal, painful and private sentiment with a stranger. It’s obvious that Les merely commodifies his feelings about Lisa to build himself up as a great and tortured artist. He uses it as part of his own personal narrative to aggrandize himself.

  13. Jimmy

    Sunday’s installment gave me real joy, seeing Les getting upstaged.