Trilogy of Error

beckoningchasm
April 12, 2015 at 11:07 pm
Odd word-balloon separation there. Almost looks like there’s a ghost speaking.

When a cartoonist relies so heavily on verbiage, you’re bound to get some inconsistencies with the dialogue balloons. We see it again in  today’s panel 1, except rather than separating, the balloons merge, making it appear that Pete is answering his own question. So giddy are Pete’s editors at the prospect of spinning the controversial yet wildly lucrative Spongeclone concept into a franchise that they breathlessly speak for and over one another, while Pete Reubens with his under-eye bags is beginning to resemble a late-career Moe Howard.

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16 Comments

Filed under Son of Stuck Funky

16 responses to “Trilogy of Error

  1. SpacemanSpiff85

    Wouldn’t “Sponge Men” imply that they’re together in the SAME book?
    Ugh. I refuse to believe that even Batiuk thinks anyone could find this interesting. There’s not the slightest bit of drama or tension, and not even an attempt at humor. I think he realized he needed to fill out some months and decided to just throw in some of the crap he wrote for his own personal “History of Batom Comics”.

  2. SpacemanSpiff85

    Also, is there a strong wind or something in the room? Because I don’t think beards swing sideways off of someone’s face like they are for the Amish Stan Lee there. Look at where his ears and neck are. That is not good drawing, to say the least.

  3. Epicus Doomus

    Tomban Bantom doing an arc about a writer being forced into creating ridiculous plot contrivances to satisfy his editors is like Kim Kardashian authoring a book about how to best keep a low profile, in which she claims that her managers keep pushing her in front of cameras all the time against her will. In keeping with this week’s “writer-as-martyr vs. Evil Corporate Overlords” theme, Pete Renbert’s editors are suddenly braying stooges, yelling out insane and idiotic comic book titles as a shattered Pete looks on wearily (in other words his standard face). I can’t even fault the guy too much here, as he obviously believes that this is just how “writing” works, it’s just embedded in his brain that this is how it is. Sigh.

  4. Yeah, spin-offs are nothing but tired cash grabs! On an unrelated note, what do you guys think of the current Crankshaft arc?

  5. This almost qualifies as a funny joke, but the weeks of bitterness and bile on Tom Batiuk’s part have kind of sucked the humor out of it. Good job, Mr. Batiuk; now even your jokes sound like they’re hurled out as insults.

  6. billytheskink

    They want to use this clone story to launch two NEW comic books? I’m not a comic book expert (a very casual fan on my best day) so those who are can correct me if I am wrong, but after initially scoffing I found this to actually be believable… if Pete was still said to be working for Marvel or DC.

    I’ve recently been in far more comic book stores than I ever expected (why so is another story) and one thing I noticed is how shelf space is at a serious premium. Despite the industry’s struggles, these stores are amazingly saturated with titles, seemingly 2/3 of them spin offs or crossovers or tv and movie tie-ins (or all of these things rolled together) and 2/3 of those being printed by the big 2 of DC and Marvel.

    So if “Mega Comics” is TB’s Marvel/DC stand-in, then yeah, they could probably get two TAMS spin off books onto the shelves. I mean, in real life you can buy comics retelling the Star Wars movies if all of the characters were gerbils and choose from 3 titles featuring the Green Lantern as a stockbroker, so why not?
    If Mega is not quite that mega, though… Pete’s new work would be lucky to get thrown behind the 3 year old Archie books in the rarely-frequented but obligatory “kid-friendly” rack.

    OK, so it’s believable… Entertaining? Less so than going to a comic book store and asking about Jackie Jokers back issues.

  7. Gyre

    So we have a writer from Westview who is working very hard on a work of fiction that has been described as being really good by other people, even though the audience won’t ever get to see it for themselves.
    The writer is forced to make changes to his work by the people in charge.
    He doesn’t ever protest these changes or try to point out any downsides to them to his boss(es).
    He goes off and thinks to himself how this is so unpleasant or talks to someone from Westview about how it’s so unpleasant.
    He has a dream sequence where he’s sent back decades to do the same writing that he’s actually doing.
    Oh, and on occasion he might see a hallucination.

    I cannot be the only one who sees this.

  8. DOlz

    Yeah man that’s like totally greedy and a sell out to use an existing title to launch new ones. It would be like TB using FW to start some new strips. Just for fun let’s call them “John Darling” and “Crankshaft”.

  9. It’s quite possible that Batiuk regrets the decision to expand his franchise. It’s why he murdered John Darling and it’s why he’s going to end up making Crankshaft a drooling vegetable stuck in a wheelchair.

  10. Nathan Obral

    The only way this storyline can end properly (which, with Batom®, will never ever ever happen) is if Mopey Petey Ramone does go all Moe Howard on the Mega Comics board.

  11. captaincab

    @SpacemanSpiff85 “Also, is there a strong wind or something in the room? Because I don’t think beards swing sideways off of someone’s face like they are for the Amish Stan Lee there. Look at where his ears and neck are. That is not good drawing, to say the least.”

    Took the words right of my mouth, what an absolute, sloppy eyesore this comic has become. As I have said many times, since Batiuk just can’t draw consistently with the “realistic” style then he should just go back to the classic FW art, at least that looked like a professional, tried and true comic strip.

  12. billytheskink
    April 16, 2015 at 1:42 am
    I’ve recently been in far more comic book stores than I ever expected…and one thing I noticed is how shelf space is at a serious premium.

    I don’t think that’s the case everywhere, BTS:

    So if “Mega Comics” is TB’s Marvel/DC stand-in…

    Since Marvel and DC are known, real-world brands, I pictured Mega Comics as a poor knockoff, like Mega Bloks is to Lego.

  13. $$$WESTVIEW ONCOLOGIST$$$

    I assume this is a knock off of how Marvel Comics was in the 90s. They created like 5 different Spiderman & X-men Books. The problem with this is that Marvel did this as far back as 1970 when they came out with a Spectacular Spiderman book. Though the I believe the idea was to write more grittier and darker adventures than would appear in the regular Spiderman. They went back to this idea in the 1980s when they made New Mutants and X-Factor to introduce characters outside of the normal X-Men characters.(namely younger mutants and the original X-Men) You see the their was a legitimate artistic reason for introducing these books.

    Sorry for the comic book nerd interlude. Correct me if I am wrong on this. LOL

  14. captaincab

    “I don’t think that’s the case everywhere, BTS:”

    I missed that, he couldn’t even be bothered to draw comic book shelves in a story about comic book fans in a scene SET IN A COMIC BOOK STORE. Wow.

  15. Full disclosure: I Photoshopped that a bit, but it’s not too far off! Here’s the source:

  16. Jimmy

    @Billytheskink:
    I think he realized he needed to fill out some months and decided to just throw in some of the crap he wrote for his own personal “History of Batom Comics”.

    I actually would find a backstory on the origins of Batom Comics interesting as a storyline, and I don’t even read comic books.